I’ve said before that Autism is like evolution…

I’ve said before that Autism is like evolution going backwards – Most people w/ Autistic children would be insulted by that description.
But it makes me wonder if our environment is changing our children because something is coming. We must change before or with the environment to avoid extinction, we can’t adapt after the change or we’d die – could our changing environment cause autism, because its going to be something we need to survive?
Autism may have had advantages in humans’ hunter-gatherer past, researcher believes
www.sciencedaily.com
Though people with autism face many challenges because of their condition, they may have been capable hunter-gatherers in prehistoric times, according to a new paper.
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This is also interesting:
Autism Caught On Tape
Computer Scientists Use Technology To Help Children With Autism

If you are going to have a “visit…

If you are going to have a “visit all the doctors – week from hell” at least end with your favorite doctor.
I am convinced that our family doctor is the most brilliant physician on the planet. It may be that she learned that I’m a bitch early on and is just giving me everything our insurance will provide, but regardless she has me convinced.
However, this post is not on the brilliant doctor, but the Autism Specialist, Dentist, and Highly Educated Child Psychologist I’ve seen in the past week (or so)

We visit a recommended Autism Specialist who is concerned with our daughters sleep habits, or lack there of. I’m asked “What does she eat?”
I LOVE answering this question, because my daughter eats serving after serving of Fruits and Vegetables.
Not so apparently the fact our daughter eats healthy foods is our problem. Healthy foods are filled with natural sugars which is making our daughter hyper.
No, my child is not hyper. Regardless if you believe if evolution or creation we were never meant to sit on our butts all day long in front of a teacher, computer, television or for any other reason. We are designed to hunt and forage.
My 3 year old daughter is naturally designed to move constantly.
My lazy butt is also designed to move constantly, but I grew up with high fructose corn syrup and suddenly my butt is slowing my down. My toddler is not hyper, she is processing the foods she is supposed to be eating in the manner in which they are supposed to be processed and her body is reacting the way it should react by giving her energy. Do I wish she could burn it off by the end of the day – why yes. I’d love to sleep sometime this decade, but I’m not going to feed her LESS of the things her body needs just so I can get a few winks.
Then there was the Dentist and hygienist who informed me that all of the fruit my daughter eats and many of the vegetables are filled with sugar and they are causing cavities.
Are you KIDDING ME?!?! What do they want me to feed her? Packaged processed foods? High in Fat and chemicals , but low in cavity cause sugars? in fact, that would be healthier for her teeth. Eye Roll!
It’s like banging your head against a wall! But there is nothing more straining to your brain then a Highly Educated Child Psychologist who is terrible with children. We’ve seen 3 and they all suck.
My daughter may have been diagnosed with Autism, but regardless ……. you can’t tell any 3 year old to ….. are you ready for this?…. “Go over to my desk and get the blue pencil and bring it to me.” after you hand her a cool toy with Sesame Street characters popping out of it while it plays music – and expect her or any child to give you the time of day!
The first child psychologist we saw had never heard of Toy Story! I didn’t have children when the first Toy Story movie was released, but I knew what it was! I may have even gone to see it! How can you be a CHILD psychologist and not know or understand what make children tick.
And these Highly Educated Child Psychologist seem to know very little about what children do at any age.
Question 1) Does she spin in circles?
A: She can spin in circles. She’s 3 yeas old!! Yes, she and her sister play ballerina.
Child Psychologists Response: That is a clear indication of Autism.
Question 2) Does your child do any hand flapping (The Psychologist illustrates hand flapping for me)
A: My daughter sees the hand flapping and mimics the Psychologist – and says “All done” (Since flapping the hands in that manner is the SIGN for “All Done.”)
Child Psychologists Response: That is a clear indication of Autism.
Question 3) Does she do any head banging.
A: She did, but we ignored it and that cured it real quick!
Child Psychologists Response: That is a clear indication of Autism.
At which point I slammed my head against the desk – why do they bother asking the questions if they plan on answering them for you?
But I didn’t debate the issue, everyone from the pre-schools to the books you read will tell you that if your child isn’t diagnosed with Autism than they are considered an ‘easy case’ and won’t get all the therapy and benefits. Many of the books will tell you that if your child isn’t diagnosed with at least something on the spectrum, that you should Question the diagnosing physician as to WHY they did not diagnose your child with Autism.
The worse the diagnoses the better the treatment. And sense a child can always be undiagnosed later, you may as well get the best treatment possible early on – Right?!?
I’m just thankful that at the end of that week, we saw our family doctor, who listened to me gripe, read over what the Autism doctor wanted, understood it, and got it all in motion – And she doesn’t think my daughter is HYPER!
She really is Brilliant!

April is Autism Awareness Month

April is Autism Awareness Month.
However, if you live with Autism, pretty much you’re aware of it every moment.
I don’t like telling people my daughter is autistic. It’s not that I’m ashamed, it’s that, just like every autistic child, she’s less complicated once you get to know her.
First, many people give me the look of “Oh you think you‘re special because you‘re part of ‘that‘ group. You want us to treat you special.”
Well, no, actually its more of a warning that if we visit your home my daughter may eat your cat – just say’n. {sarcasm}
*sigh*
Then it’s the image that she’s going to be screaming, flopping around on the floor and biting the other children.
No, she’s not going to scream, flop or bite anymore than any other 3 year old. (BTW, I was a biter at age 4!)
*sigh*
So I must go into the abridged explanation as to not lose their attention, but be informative at the same time.
“She‘s just like every other 3 year old, she just can‘t communicate, she doesn‘t understand language. Oh and she chews on everything.”
That leads to “Well, that doesn‘t sound like Autism”
Really? I thought so too, however the 50 or so therapists and doctors with various degrees of degrees, disagree.
*sigh*
Then, like every other child on the planet, she makes a liar out of me as she looks them in the eyes and says “I like a kitty”
“You said she couldn‘t talk”
No, what I said was ‘she can’t communicate’ – she can talk.
This only calls into question my parenting skills, since the child can speak, but can’t ask for a cookie.
To make myself feel better and because I know where this conversation is leading, I add “She can also Read, Spell, Write, Count, and use Sign Language.”
At this point, I am informed that I need a second opinion because “Clearly she is some kind of brilliant savant.”
*sigh*
As if brilliant savants don’t come with their own lists of complicated issues.
Times where I don’t need to give great amount of detail, I will say “My daughter is special needs”
But that tends to imply she’s in a wheel chair, it’s not very accurate. She doesn’t use any special equipment, she doesn’t “need” you to do anything special for her (other then hide anything of valuable, breakable and/or small).
I’m trying out “Differently-Abled.” It makes me sound snotty and people tend to listen to more than when I say “Autistic.”

April is Autism Awareness Month

April is Autism Awareness Month.
However, if you live with Autism, pretty much you’re aware of it every moment.
I don’t like telling people my daughter is autistic. It’s not that I’m ashamed, it’s that, just like every autistic child, she’s less complicated once you get to know her.
First, many people give me the look of “Oh you think you‘re special because you‘re part of ‘that‘ group. You want us to treat you special.”
Well, no, actually its more of a warning that if we visit your home my daughter may eat your cat – just say’n. {sarcasm}
*sigh*
Then it’s the image that she’s going to be screaming, flopping around on the floor and biting the other children.
No, she’s not going to scream, flop or bite anymore than any other 3 year old. (BTW, I was a biter at age 4!)
*sigh*
So I must go into the abridged explanation as to not lose their attention, but be informative at the same time.
“She‘s just like every other 3 year old, she just can‘t communicate, she doesn‘t understand language. Oh and she chews on everything.”
That leads to “Well, that doesn‘t sound like Autism”
Really? I thought so too, however the 50 or so therapists and doctors with various degrees of degrees, disagree.
*sigh*
Then, like every other child on the planet, she makes a liar out of me as she looks them in the eyes and says “I like a kitty”
“You said she couldn‘t talk”
No, what I said was ‘she can’t communicate’ – she can talk.
This only calls into question my parenting skills, since the child can speak, but can’t ask for a cookie.
To make myself feel better and because I know where this conversation is leading, I add “She can also Read, Spell, Write, Count, and use Sign Language.”
At this point, I am informed that I need a second opinion because “Clearly she is some kind of brilliant savant.”
*sigh*
As if brilliant savants don’t come with their own lists of complicated issues.
Times where I don’t need to give great amount of detail, I will say “My daughter is special needs”
But that tends to imply she’s in a wheel chair, it’s not very accurate. She doesn’t use any special equipment, she doesn’t “need” you to do anything special for her (other then hide anything of valuable, breakable and/or small).
I’m trying out “Differently-Abled.” It makes me sound snotty and people tend to listen to more than when I say “Autistic.”